Engineering

Luminaries of Marquette Engineering

For over 100 years, Marquette’s College of Engineering has graduated engineers that have made significant contributions to the engineering profession and society through their innovations, accomplishments, and leadership. As a tribute to these successful graduates, Marquette alumni and friends were asked to nominate distinguished alumni, or Luminaries of Marquette Engineering. A selection committee comprised of ten alumni, faculty and staff, were charged with the difficult task of selecting the luminaries from a pool of more than 300 illustrious nominations. The individuals below were selected for their outstanding achievements, innovation, and contributions to the profession. How do you capture the scope of a Luminaries’ career in a couple sentences? We’ve highlighted just a few of these remarkable achievements.


The Luminaries of Marquette Engineering include:

Kurt W. Bauer, Eng ’51
Joseph D. Bonness, Sr., Eng ’22
John E. Breen, Sr., Ph.D., Eng ’53, Hon Deg '04
Michael L. Corradini, Ph.D., Eng ’75
Horace B. Edwards, Eng ’46
Andrew J. Fleckenstein, Eng ’54
Barbara G. Fox, Eng ’57
Richard J. Fridl, Eng ’49
Edward J. Gerrits, Eng ’25
Luther W. Graef, Eng ’52
Robert C. Greenheck, Eng ’50
F. William Gutzwiller, Eng ’49
Patrick E. Haggerty, Eng’ 36 Hon Deg ’60
Rear Adm. Donald G. Iselin, Eng ’44
Stanley V. Jaskolski, Ph.D., Eng ’62, ’64, ’67
Leon K. Kirchmayer, Ph.D., Eng ’45
Thomas F. Kuech, Grad ’78
David A. Kuemmel, Eng ’54
Leo J. Lechtenberg, Eng ’38
John H. Linehan, Ph.D., Eng ’60

 

Kurt W. Bauer Kurt W. Bauer, Ph.D.
Eng'51

Bauer served as executive director of the Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (SEWRPC) where he oversaw comprehensive planning for the region comprising 2,689 square miles of land and 1.9 million people. He shared his expertise serving on many national and regional boards, publishing in his field, and teaching at Marquette University. Bauer received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1973.

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Joseph D. Bonness Joseph D. Bonness, Sr.
Eng ’22

Bonness began his career as an independent contractor in 1928. By the mid-1960s, he had built one of the largest construction businesses in the state consisting of Joseph D. Bonness Inc., Bonness Co., Highway Pavers Inc. and Koch & Bonness Inc. He also served on many boards and received numerous awards, including Marquette’s All-University Alumnus of the Year Award in 1961.

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John E. Breen, Sr. John E. Breen, Sr., Ph.D.
Eng ’53, Hon Deg ’04

An acclaimed civil engineer and educator, Breen influenced the principal design and construction standards for concrete bridges and buildings nationally and internationally. His research garnered induction into the National Academy of Engineering and awards from organizations such as the American Society of Civil Engineers, American Concrete Institute, Prestressed Concrete Institute, American Segmental Bridge Institute, International Federation for Prestressed Concrete, and Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1983.

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Michael L. Corradini Michael L. Corradini, Ph.D.
Eng ’75

Chairman and distinguished professor of the Wisconsin Institute of Nuclear Systems at the University of  Wisconsin-Madison, Corradini served on many national and international boards. His expertise in commercial nuclear power plant and emerging waste-processing technology safety earned him election as a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and induction into the National Academy of Engineering in 1998. In 2001, Corradini received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award.

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Horace B. Edwards Horace B. Edwards
Eng ’46

Edwards’ leadership skills enabled him to excel in several management roles and ultimately serve as president, chairman, and CEO of ARCO Pipeline Company. Through his membership on various corporate boards and speaking engagements, Edwards served as a role model for African-Americans and young children.  He received numerous awards, including Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1984.

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Andrew J. Fleckenstein Andrew J. Fleckenstein
Eng ’54

Fleckenstein’s professional career flourished with Fleck Controls, an international manufacturer of control valves used in water treatment equipment. Through his philanthropy, he has encouraged and made possible education and research opportunities for many students, particularly in the field of engineering. Fleckenstein is a member of the Water Quality Association Hall of Fame, and received Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus and All-University Alumnus of the Year Awards in 1992 and 1997 respectively.

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Barbara G. Fox Barbara G. Fox
Eng ’57

Fox was Marquette’s first woman civil engineering graduate and the first woman engineer hired by Chicago’s Water Department. There she spent nearly 37 years working to build and maintain a clean water system. Serving on many national boards and committees, Fox was the first female member of the American Society of Civil Engineers Board. She received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1990.

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Richard J. Fridl Richard J. Fridl
Eng ’49

A World War II veteran, Fridl attended Marquette University on the GI Bill and went on to become president and chief operating officer of Heil Co. He received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1993 and Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1996.

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Edward J. Gerritts Edward J. Gerrits
Eng ’25

Gerrits founded Edward J. Gerrits, Inc., a construction firm that completed housing projects in Florida and Puerto Rico. The firm grew to become one of the largest in the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. Gerrits received Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1972 and All-University Alumnus of the Year Award in 1978.

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Luther W. Graef Luther W. Graef
Eng ’52

Graef co-founded the engineering firm GRAEF, formerly known as Graef, Anhalt, Schloemer and Associates, in 1961. Starting with only a handful of employees, he helped grow the company to approximately 300 professionals today. Graef is the only Wisconsin engineer to achieve the office of President of the American Society of Civil Engineers, an organization that has existed for more than a century. He has received many awards including Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement and Distinguished Alumnus Awards in 1982 and 1998 respectively.

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Robert C. Greenheck Robert C. Greenheck
Eng ’50

In 1947 Greenheck and his brother founded Greenheck Fan Corporation, a company that has grown into a global leader in manufacturing ventilation equipment, with plants in Wisconsin, Kentucky, California, and China. Greenheck has received numerous awards for his achievements, including Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2004 and All-University Merit Award in 2009.

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F. William Gutzwiller F. William Gutzwiller
Eng ’49

During his career at General Electric, Gutzwiller was part of the team that invented the silicon controlled rectifier, which has made a global impact on the frequency control of motors, and the TRIAC, a switch used in light dimmers and electric motor controls. He also invented circuits to make these devices applicable and wrote manuals to communicate their function. Gutzwiller received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1979 and Dean’s Award in 2008.

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Patrick E. Haggerty Patrick E. Haggerty
Eng ’36, Hon Deg ’60

Following his time as a reserve officer in the U.S. Navy, Haggerty joined Geophysical Service, Inc., predecessor to Texas Instruments, a company he and others founded. Under his tutelage as president and chairman, Texas Instruments became a public company and commercially developed the transistor as well as the breakthrough silicon transistor, allowing for the introduction of the transistor radio to the world market. Haggerty received the Engineering Distinguished Alumnus and All-University Alumnus of the Year Awards in 1966 and 1972 respectively.

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Donald G. Iselin Donald G. Iselin
Eng ’44

Iselin, a retired rear admiral in the U.S. Navy, attended both Marquette University and the U.S. Naval Academy. Throughout his career he was instrumental in managing large engineering and construction projects for the U.S. Navy. In 1980 he was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering for his “innovative leadership in planning and meeting civil engineering challenges of great importance to the nation.” Iselin received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1980.

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Stanley V. Jaskolski Stanley V. Jaskolski, Ph.D. Eng ’62, Grad ’64, ’67

Jaskolski taught in Marquette’s College of Engineering for 15 years before joining Eaton Corporation as executive director of technology development and advancing to chief technology officer. He was later appointed by President Clinton to serve as a member of the National Science Board. In 2003 Jaskolski  returned to Marquette where he served as OPUS Dean of Engineering until 2010, leading efforts to transform the College of Engineering curriculum and facilities. He received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1998.

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Leon K. Kirchmayer Leon K. Kirchmayer, Ph.D. Eng ’45

Kirchmayer pioneered the development of analytical, computer control techniques applied to the operation and planning of utility power systems. He is the author of two books and more than 100 technical papers. He also held four patents on computer control of power systems. Kirchmayer’s work has been acknowledged with many honors including induction into the National Academy of Engineering in 1979 and Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1991.

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Thomas F. Kuech Thomas F. Kuech
Grad ’78

Kuech was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering for his contributions to chemical vapor deposition of compound semiconductors. He is a prolific writer and served as the inaugural director of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

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David A. Kuemmel David A. Kuemmel
Eng ’54

Kuemmel’s achievements include selection as one of 1987’s Top 10 Public Works Directors in the United States and establishing the Transportation Research Center at Marquette University, where he taught for fifteen years. He has been recognized for research in improving visibility of work zone signs, safety implications of applying snow and ice control products, and texturing of pavements to reduce highway noise. Kuemmel received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1987.

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Leo J. Lechtenberg Leo J. Lechtenberg
Eng ’38

Known as the “father of the aluminum engine,” Lechtenberg compiled 21 patents in the engine field, including, of course, the aluminum engine, which has had a significant impact on the development of the rotary lawn mower market. Over the course of his 40 year career with Briggs & Stratton, Lechtenberg earned many awards including Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1976.

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John H. Linehan John H. Linehan, Ph.D.
Eng ’60

As founding chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Marquette University, Linehan now serves as professor at both Northwestern University and Stanford University. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2006 for his research on pulmonary mechanics and the metabolism of critical bioactive agents and for innovations in bioengineering education and professional development.

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Luminaries of Marquette Engineering continued:

Thomas A. Lipo, Ph.D., Eng ’62
Cecil Lue-Hing, Ph.D. Eng ’61
Milton A. Lunda, Eng ’43
Joseph E. Matar, Ph.D., Eng ’44
Rollie C. McMahan, Eng ’24
Anthony N. Michel, Ph.D. Eng ’58, ’64, ’68
Arthur C. Moeller, Ph.D.Eng ’51
Albert L. Nowicki, Eng ’30
Gerald A. Rauenhorst, Eng ’51, Hon Deg ’01
Lindon E. Saline, Ph.D. Eng ’45
John D. Santi, Eng ’52
Christian A. Spexarth, Eng ’31
Pericles P. Stathas, Eng ’23
Corienne E. Stevens, Eng ’47
Lowell L. Turriff, Eng ’58
John F. Wakerly, Ph.D., Eng ’70
Anthony V. Weasler, Sr., Eng ’29
Thomas A. Zdeblick, M.D., Eng ’78
Joseph J. Zimmerman, Eng ’35

 


Thomas A. Lipo Thomas A. Lipo, Ph.D.
Eng ’62

Lipo serves as the Director of the Wisconsin Power Electronics Research Center and has made significant contributions to the design and development of variable speed drives and motor controls. He helped pioneer the computer simulation of converters and contributed to the analysis and design of a wide range of industrial applications. Lipo was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2008.

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Cecil Lue-Hing Cecil Lue-Hing, Ph.D.
Eng ’61

Lue-Hing has led a distinguished career dedicated to the protection and conservation of natural resources. His research has been recognized by the World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization and the International Association on Water Quality. Lue-Hing’s contributions to water pollution control engineering and, in particular biosolids management, led to his election to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000. He received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 2006.

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Milton A. Lunda Milton A. Lunda
Eng ’43

Lunda grew his Lunda Construction Company into a nationally respected bridge building firm. A strong construction industry and transportation advocate, Lunda enhanced the stature and business of the bridge building industry. His work led to many accolades including Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1989 and All-University Merit Award in 1997.

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Joseph E. Matar Joseph E. Matar, Ph.D.
Eng ’44

Matar’s 50 year teaching career includes time at Marquette University as a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, dean of the College of Engineering and associate provost. Over the course of his career, he emerged as a worldwide expert in the fields of reliability, design of experiments and Taguchi methods. Matar’s extensive knowledge led to a second career in consulting and conducting seminars for international corporations.

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Rollie C. McMahan Rollie C. McMahan
Eng ’24

McMahan was the first African-American to graduate from Marquette’s College of Engineering – quite the accomplishment given the state of race relations in the mid-1920s. In addition to earning his electrical engineering degree, McMahan participated in Marquette varsity football, track and hockey.

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Anthony N. Michel Anthony N. Michel, Ph.D.
Eng ’58, Grad ’64, ’68

Known for research in qualitative analysis of dynamical systems, Michel is a past professor and emeritus dean of engineering at the University of Notre Dame. He served on numerous boards and has co-authored 10 books and a number of publications in journals and conference proceedings. Michel has received countless awards for his work including the Fulbright Scholarship 1992, Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1985 and Marquette’s Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2005.

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Arthur C. Moeller Arthur C. Moeller, Ph.D.
Eng ’51

Moeller was a member of the Marquette community for over sixty years, serving as an instructor in mathematics and engineering, dean of the College of Engineering, and academic vice president. Under Moeller’s leadership, the university saw significant progress in terms of academic achievement due to his work to achieve high academic quality.

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Albert L. Nowicki Albert L. Nowicki
Eng ’30

Nowicki’s career was defined by his passion for lunar photogrammetry, cartography, geodesics, and terrestrial and extraterrestrial mapping. The first “moon mapper,” he helped pave the way for unmanned and manned space exploration by initiating the mapping of Mars. Nowicki was a World War II veteran decorated for his wartime bridge building and other tactical and strategic engineering achievements. He was known worldwide as a pioneer in topographic mapping techniques, an author and a sought-after lecturer and teacher.

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Gerald A. Raunehorst Gerald A. Rauenhorst
Eng ’51, Hon Deg ’01

In 1953 Rauenhorst founded the Rauenhorst Construction Company. Known today as The OPUS Group, the company has become a leader in commercial real estate development that has changed the face of communities across the nation through their engineering, development, property management, financing and leasing services. Rauenhorst has received considerable recognition including Marquette’s Alumnus of the Year Award in 1969, the Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1974, and induction into the Minnesota Business Hall of Fame in 2001.

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Lindon E. Saline Lindon E. Saline, Ph.D.
Eng ’45

Throughout his career with General Electric, Saline managed various technical and business operations of strategic significance including GE’s Management Development Institute. His contributions have been recognized with awards, membership on boards, and the publication of his book, Doing What’s Right, Right. Saline received Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1981.

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ohn D. Santi John D. Santi
Eng ’52

Santi’s career with Briggs & Stratton spans nearly fifty years and includes nearly fifty patents. He has been described as “a tenacious and gifted inventor” as he excelled throughout his career improving small gasoline engine efficiency. Santi received Marquette’s Engineering Service Award in 1994 and All-University Service Award in 1999.

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Christian A. Spexarth Christian A. Spexarth
Eng ’31

Spexarth served as chief engineer at Harley-Davidson and held several patents, most notably for the twist grip operator which was a breakthrough in the motorcycle industry. His involvement on professional and civic boards provided opportunities to share his knowledge.

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ericles P. Strathas Pericles P. Stathas
Eng ’23

Stathas served in various engineering and administrative roles with the Wisconsin Electric Power Company. He appeared before numerous professional groups as a lecturer on public utilities and received many awards for his outstanding work in the utility field including Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1967.

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Corrine E. Stevens Corienne E. Stevens
Eng ’47

Stevens was the first woman to graduate from Marquette’s College of Engineering. From there she went on to have a successful career with Ladish Company and Pratt & Whitney. At a time when few women were in the engineering field, Stevens excelled in her work with space shuttles and jet engines. She has received numerous awards for her accomplishments including Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1979.

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Lowell L. Turriff Lowell L. Turriff
Eng ’58

Turriff’s entrepreneurial spirit and passion for computer hardware led him to make a significant impact on the semiconductor industry. After founding two companies, he continued to innovate, serve on boards and contribute to the semiconductor profession.

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John F. Wakerly John F. Wakerly, Ph.D.
Eng ’70

Wakerly is an independent technical consultant and expert for computer and communications patent and trade-secret matters. In addition to serving as Cisco System’s CTO for the Routing Technology Group, he has founded companies of his own in this field and served as a consultant to others. Wakerly has authored eight textbooks and over fifty papers, holds twenty patents in telecommunications and networking technology and is a consulting professor at Stanford University. He received Marquette’s Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2001.

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Anthony V. Weasler, Sr. Anthony V, Weasler, Sr.
Eng ’29

Weasler’s  company, a manufacturer of mechanical power transmission equipment, grew to be a nationally recognized leader in its field. With 25 U.S. and foreign patents, he proved himself to be an innovator, manufacturer, and marketer. He served on many national boards and received numerous awards throughout his career including Marquette’s Engineering Service, Engineering Distinguished Alumnus, and All-University Service Awards in 1975, 1991 and 1982 respectively.

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Thomas A. Zdeblick, M.D.
Thomas A. Zdeblick, M.D.
Eng ’78

Zdeblick is director of the University of Wisconsin Spine Center and founder of the Lumbar Spine Research Society. He holds 14 patents, and has helped thousands of patients with his problem-solving approach. With hundreds of published papers, Zdeblick’s dedication to innovation, research, and academics will continue to impact the treatment of spinal disorders.

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Joseph J. Zimmerman Joseph J. Zimmerman
Eng ’35

Inventor of the first answering machine, Zimmerman holds nearly fifty patents ranging from recorders used in monitoring patients’ hearts to a system that captures flight landing information. He received a Governor’s Award for the development of an Electronic Sentry Warning Unit, an automatic dial system used in emergency situations. He also received Marquette’s Engineering Professional Achievement Award in 1977.

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