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Guidelines for Interlibrary Loans Historical Note/Scope and Content


BUREAU OF CATHOLIC INDIAN MISSIONS RECORDS

BLACK AND INDIAN MISSION COLLECTION (COMMISSION FOR THE CATHOLIC MISSIONS AMONG THE COLORED PEOPLE AND THE INDIANS)

HISTORICAL NOTE/SCOPE AND CONTENT


Records of the three affiliated Catholic institutions of the Mission House or Black and Indian Mission Office -- the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions, the Black and Indian Mission Collection (formally known as the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians) and The Catholic Negro-American Mission Board (formerly The Catholic Board for Mission Work among the Colored People). The records of these organizations document Catholic evangelization in the United States and dependent territories.

Gift of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions, 1977-[ongoing]. Processed by Philip C. Bantin, 1977-1986, and Mark G. Thiel, CA (Certified Archivist), 1986-[ongoing]. Selected series microfilmed, 1980-[ongoing]. De Rancé, Incorporated (Milwaukee), provided generous support for the initial acquisition and processing of records, 1976-1980.

See e-Archives for select materials available online.

Restrictions: Restricted records are described below in the Scope and Content Notes. Access to these records requires permission in writing from the Black and Indian Mission Office, 2021 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20006-4207. Phone: (202) 331-8542. Newsletter: The Sentinel. Website: Black and Indian Mission Office. In addition, the researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. Consult an archivist for further information.


Historical Note

Notable Events

1884 The U.S. Bishops' held the Third Plenary Council in Baltimore under Archbishop James Cardinal Gibbons of Baltimore, the Apostolic Delegate. The Council decreed the establishment of a national annual appeal in support African American and Native American evangelization to be held on the first Sunday of Lent. It gave the administration of the appeal to a commission of three bishops without Indian missions in their diocese, which was assisted by a priest-secretary. incorporated as the "Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians" with a priest-secretary as administrative assistant.
1887-[ongoing] The Lenten appeal began with modest responses. It collected funds from 66 of the 84 dioceses and dispersed funds to 34 dioceses and organizations supporting missions. Notable contributing Arch/Dioceses included: Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Brooklyn and notable receiving Arch/Dioceses included: Charleston, Jackson/Natchez, Mobile, New Orleans, and St. Joseph's Seminary for African American missions; and Alaska and the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions for Native American missions.
1887-1916 As Native American Indian missions, the Lenten appeal provided funding to the Diocese of Corpus Christi for Hispanic American missions in south Texas.
1887-1916 The Lenten appeal provided funding to African American missions in the Bahamas, then attached to the Archdiocese of New York.
1920-1926 The Lenten appeal provided funding to African American missions in Haiti via the Diocese of Cap-Haitien.
1891 Katharine Drexel founded the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored People, which focused on evangelization to African Americans and Native Americans in the United States.
1900 There were 101,000 Native American Catholics and 144,000 African American Catholics in the United States. The Native Americans were served in at least 154 churches and 68 schools and the African Americans were served in 45 churches and 109 schools.
1905- The Catholic Church Extension Society was established in Chicago to aid in the building and supplying of churches and schools in needy areas throughout the United States.
1905 At their annual meeting, the U.S. archbishops determined that funding from the Lenten collection was insufficient to meet the evangelization needs in the Black community. Therefore, they called for the creation of a special board to establish a second funding stream for Black evangelization, which became the Catholic Negro-American Mission Board established in 1907.
1905-1927, 1977 As Native American Indian missions, the Lenten appeal provided funding to the Diocese of Aguña/Guam for evangelization among indigenous Pacific Islanders.
1906-1944 As Native American Indian missions, the Lenten appeal provided funding to the Diocese of Mountain Province/Nueva Segovia of the Philippines, then a U.S. territory, for evangelization among the Igorot People.
1910 As Native American Indian missions, the Lenten appeal provided funding to the Diocese of Tucson for evangelization among the Yaqui Indians. Most Yaqui Indians were immigrants from Mexico since 1780. Tucson became the first diocese to received Black and Indian Mission collection funding for missions to immigrant Indians from Latin America.
1915 The Lenten appeal incorporated in Baltimore as the Commission for Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians.
1923-[ongoing] The National Catholic Welfare Conference, later renamed the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, assumed a support role for African American and Native American evangelization.
1930-[ongoing] The narrative quality of correspondence diminished as the telephone replaced correspondence as the primary communications tool throughout the United States.
1930-[ongoing] The quantity, quality, and diversity of photographs grew as technology improved photography and as more rural stores served the amateur photography market throughout the United States.
1935 To enable joint board meetings while maintaining separate corporations, the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions and the Commission for Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians standardized the membership of their boards of directors, who since then, have been the archbishops (ordinaries) of Baltimore, New York, and Philadelphia.
1952 The Lenten appeal exceeded $1 million for the first time. It received funds from 117 out of 131 dioceses and dispersed funds to 79 diocese and 9 other Catholic agencies. Notable contributing Arch/Diocese included: Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Paul, and Springfield. Notable recipients included: Charleston, Jackson/Natchez, Lafayette, Mobile, New Orleans, the Josephites, and Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for African American missions; and Alaska, Gallup, Tucson, the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions, and the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Native American missions.
1950s-[ongoing] Immigration from various Latin American countries expanded the number, size, and cultural diversity of African, Hispanic, and Native American communities.
1977-[ongoing] The Lenten appeal began to support the Tekakwitha Conference by providing direct funding of the Conference's National Office and aid through diocesan appropriations for Native Americans to attend annual Conference meetings.
1977-1981 The United States Catholic Conference Ad-Hoc Committee on National Collections attempted to fold the Lenten appeal into a consolidated program of national Catholic collections. By successfully opposing this attempt, Monsignor Paul A. Lenz preserved its independence and that of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions, which depended on this funding.
1977 Marquette University became the archival repository for the Lenten appeal.
1980 To enable joint board meetings while remaining a separate corporation, the Catholic Negro American Mission Board standardized the membership of its board of directors to conform to that of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions and the Commission for Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians, which are the archbishops (ordinaries) of Baltimore, New York, and Philadelphia.
1985 The Lenten appeal exceeded $5 million for the first time. It received funds from 168 of 186 dioceses and disbursed funds to 121 dioceses and 14 other Catholics agencies. Notable contributing Arch/Dioceses included: Boston, Buffalo, Detroit, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, New York, Philadelphia, Rockville Center, and St. Louis. Notable recipients included: Charleston, Jackson/Natchez, Lafayette, Mobile, New Orleans, Josephites, and Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for African American missions; and Fairbanks, Gallup, Tucson, the BCIM, and Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Native American missions.
1988 Mother Katharine Drexel, S.B.S., was beatified.
1988 The Lenten appeal began to support the National Black Catholic Congress.
1990 Because demands greatly outpaced income, the Lenten appeal narrowed its funding scope. It no longer granted funds to dioceses for evangelizing Blacks and Indians who had entered the United States since the mid-20th century, e.g. ministries to Haitians and Mayan Indians from Central America, and it no longer granted funds to dioceses to evangelize people of Indian ancestry who lacked tribal identities, e.g. Hispanics, Mestizos, Métis.
2000 Mother Katharine Drexel, S.B.S., was declared Saint Katharine Drexel.
2005 The Lenten appeal exceeded $9 million for the first time.
2008-[ongoing] The Commission became known as the Black and Indian Mission Collection, and its shared offices with the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions and the Catholic Negro-American Mission Board became known as the Black and Indian Mission Office.
2009-2010 The Black and Indian Mission Office temporarily maintained a National Advisory Council of lay Catholics.

Executive Directors (formerly known as Secretary-Treasurers)

Biographies: Click on names (also in Series 14-1, Box 91). The Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions Digital Image Collection includes portraits of the first two executive directors.

1884-1925 Reverend Edward R. Dyer, S.S. (1854-1925)
1925-1976 Reverend John B. Tennelly, S.S. (1890-1981)
1976-2007 Monsignor Paul A. Lenz (1925-)
2007-present Reverend W. Carroll Paysse

Administrative Assistants

1980s-2007 Patricia O'Rourke

Presidents of the Board of Directors

1884-1921 Cardinal James Gibbons (1834-1921), Archbishop of Baltimore
1921-1951 Cardinal Denis J. Dougherty (1865-1951), Archbishop of Philadelphia
1951-1967 Cardinal Francis J. Spellman (1889-1967), Archbishop of New York
1967-1974 Cardinal Lawrence Shehan (1898-1984), Archbishop of Baltimore
1974-1988 Cardinal John J. Kroll (1910-1996), Archbishop of Philadelphia
1988-2000 Archbishop William D. Borders (1913-2010), Archbishop of Baltimore
2000-2003 Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua (1923-), Archbishop of Philadelphia, Retired
2003-2007 Cardinal William H. Keeler (1931-), Archbishop of Baltimore, Retired
2007-2009 Cardinal Edward M. Egan (1932-), Archbishop of New York, Retired
2009-2011 Archbishop Edward O'Brien (1939-), Archbishop of Baltimore
2011-present Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan (1950-), Archbishop of New York


Scope and Content

Series: 1 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 9 | 14 | 16

Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 1 General Correspondence: The original documents to 1920 are in fragile physical condition. Therefore, researchers desiring to use this correspondence may be directed to the microfilm version.

Between 1977-1980 and in 1997, Marquette University microfilmed Series 1 through 1975 with the exception of scant amounts of oversight correspondence, 1957-1975.

The correspondence is arranged either alphabetically or by year and there under alphabetically. Geographical access can be achieved through the author index via the names of prospective local correspondents, e.g. bishops, pastors. Researchers unfamiliar with diocesan ecclesiastical history, and the names of past bishops and pastors, may wish to consult sources such as: the diocesan entries in Guides to Catholic-Related Records about Native Americans in the United States; Catholic-Hierarchy, The Official Catholic Directory, and Index to the Catholic Directories for the United States with Appended Countries, 1817, 1822, 1833-.

See Series 7-2 for the Commission's charter, bi-laws. and related correspondence.

Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 1 Index of Correspondence: The index is complete through 1980 and includes all correspondents with the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions and the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians, except the directors while in office, i.e. Reverend Tennelly, 1935-1976, and Monsignor Lenz, 1976-1980. The names are alphabetized by surnames, if known or forenames when surnames are not given, along with titles and initials designating religious order affiliations, e.g. example, "Sister Mary, O.S.F.". Places of residence are also included, if known. Persons with name variations are cross-indexed. Native American ethnicity is included, if known. In some instances, native ethnicity was confirmed through cross-referencing with Series 2-1 Bureau School Records and other sources that confirmed affinities between specific surnames and ethnic groups.

Other series within the records of the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians and other Marquette University collections also contain documentation relating to this series.

The Series 1 Index of Correspondence exists in card form only. The Marquette Archives welcomes queries and will provide pertinent excerpts upon request.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. The records after 1975 have not been processed for research and are restricted for 25 years after their date of creation. Consult an archivist for further information.

1884-1925

Reverend Edward R. Dyer, S.S., Part 1 -- Series 1-2: General correspondence of the administration of Reverend Edward R. Dyer, S.S., first secretary of the collection, 1884-1925. The correspondence begins with facsimiles in Series 1-2, [1875-1919], n.d. The papers are arranged alphabetically by surname and include letters from the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions. A few letters date from before 1884, when the Commission for Catholic Missions Among the Colored People and the Indians was established.

The Sulpician U.S. Province Archives produced the facsimiles in 1995 from the original Reverend Edward R. Dyer, S.S., Papers, Record Group 10, Box 13 of the Sulpician U.S. Province Archives, Baltimore, Maryland. Marquette University microfilmed the Dyer correspondence in 1997. Correspondence pertaining to a specific Native American mission, parish, or school is interfiled within Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions Records, Series 1-1.

Reverend Edward R. Dyer, S.S., Part 2 -- Series 1-1 (Originals and Microfilm): The general correspondence of Reverend Dyer as secretary of the collection continues within Series 1-1 of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions Records. It is interspersed by year within category “50-General” and then alphabetized under “Commission for Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians.” Marquette University has microfilmed this series, which includes some early ledger-book copies with marginal legibility. Correspondence pertaining to a specific Native American mission, parish, or school is interfiled within Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions Records, Series 1-1.

1925-1976

Reverend John B. Tennelly, S.S., Series 1-1 (Originals and Microfilm): General correspondence of the administration of Reverend John B. Tennelly, S.S., fifth director of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions and second secretary of the collection, 1925-1976. The general correspondence of the collection is arranged by year under the heading “50-General” and then alphabetized under “Commission for Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians.” Marquette University has microfilmed this series through 1975. Not included from the Tennelly administration is correspondence from 1976 and a small folder of oversight correspondence from 1953 to 1975. Correspondence pertaining to a specific Native American mission, parish, or school is interfiled within Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions Records, Series 1-1.

1976-2007

Monsignor Paul A. Lenz, Series 1-2 (Originals): General correspondence of the administration of Monsignor Paul A. Lenz, sixth director of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions and third secretary of the collection, 1976-2007. The general correspondence of the collection is arranged chronologically with undated items appearing at the end of each decade. Marquette University has not microfilmed the correspondence from the administration of Monsignor Lenz.

Series 5-5 contains correspondence with dioceses and other organizations relative to the financial transactions of the collection.


Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 5, Diocesan Correspondence and Aid Applications and Reports: Correspondence aid applications, and accountability reports from dioceses throughout the United States plus other organizations that received funding from the Black and Indian Mission Collection. The applications describe evangelization needs for funding and the reports describe how the current year's funds have been used and the results that have been realized. This series has been microfilmed through 1976 and is restricted after 1985. To 1976, most correspondence pertaining to a specific Native American mission, parish, or school was interfiled in the Series 1-1 Correspondence of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions. All other commission correspondence was interfiled as noted above in Series 1-1 Correspondence of the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians. Other series within the records of the Commission for Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians and other Marquette University collections also contain documentation relating to this series.

Throughout their history, diocesan jurisdiction over a given parish, mission, or school may have changed one or more times. As this occurred, responsibilities regarding this institution would change dioceses (ordinaries) accordingly. A bishop's correspondence to/from the Bureau may be filed among the correspondence of a specific institution, if it pertains to that one institution, or it may be filed under the general correspondence of a state, if it pertains to two or more institutions. Researchers unfamiliar with diocesan ecclesiastical history, and the names of past bishops and pastors, may wish to consult sources such as: the diocesan entries in Guides to Catholic-Related Records about Native Americans in the United States; Catholic-Hierarchy, The Official Catholic Directory, and Index to the Catholic Directories for the United States with Appended Countries, 1817, 1822, 1833-.

On occasion, the Commission funded limited evangelization beyond the scope of Native and African American evangelization in the United States, which is detailed in the chronology above. Non-Indian evangelization in Texas, the Philippines (Mountain Province), and the U.S. Pacific territories was funded as Native American evangelization, whereas non-Black-American evangelization in the Bahamas and Haiti was funded as African American evangelization with the records filed accordingly in Series 5-1 and 5-2. Some dioceses combined their Native American and African American applications and reports,  e.g. "New Orleans", which are listed within Series 5-2.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. These records are restricted for 25 years after their date of creation. Consult an archivist for further information.

Series 5-1: Diocesan funding applications and accountability reports pertaining to American Indian or Native American evangelization through 1975. The forms are arranged alphabetically by diocese and there under chronologically by year. Also included is the occasional funding of evangelization in Texas, the Philippines, and the U.S. Pacific territories, which was classified as Indian evangelization and is detailed in the chronology above. Because the Diocese of Vancouver, Canada, administered the Church in Alaska until 1909, the corresponding reports and applications for Alaska are listed under the Diocese of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, which follows at the end of this series. Most related correspondence is included in Series 1-1, although occasional letters have been interfiled with the reports and applications. Series 5-5 includes some 1973 support documentation for the dioceses of Jackson, Mississippi, and San Diego, California. Series 5-5 succeeded this series, beginning in 1976.

Series 5-2: Diocesan funding applications and accountability reports pertaining to Colored, Negro, Black, or African American evangelization through 1975. The forms are arranged alphabetically by diocese and there under chronologically by year. Also included is the occasional funding of evangelization in the Bahamas and Haiti, which was classified as Black evangelization and is detailed in the chronology above. Most related correspondence is included in Series 1-1, although occasional letters have been interfiled with the reports and applications. Series 5-5 includes some 1973 support documentation for the dioceses of Jackson, Mississippi, and San Diego, California. Series 5-5 succeeded this series, beginning in 1976.

Series 5-3: Statistical reports on African American missions, which are arranged chronologically by year.

Series 5-4: Statistical summaries on Native American missions and schools, which are arranged chronologically by year.

Series 5-5: Combined diocesan funding applications and accountability reports for Native American and African American evangelization plus related correspondence and documentation. This combined series began in 1976 and was preceded by Series 5-1 and 5-2, which ended in 1975. The arrangement continues alphabetically by diocese and there under chronologically by year.

The Commission combined the separate Native American and African American forms with separate Native American and African American application and reporting sections. Related correspondence and clippings are also interfiled with the reports and applications.

Series 5-5 Restrictions: These records are restricted for 25 years after their date of creation. For more information, please consult the archives staff.


Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 6, Financial Records: Comprised of cash books, financial statements and compilations, and balance sheets, which are arranged by type of record and there under chronologically. The records have been microfilmed through 1952. Other series within the records of the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians and other Marquette University collections also contain documentation relating to this series.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. Consult an archivist for further information.


Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 7, Publications: The publications are divided into published annual reports and general publications. The reports include five titles, which succeed each other:

        • Mission Work Among the Negroes and the Indians, 1886-1903, 1917-1925
        • Report of the Mission Work Among the Negroes and the Indians, 1904-1916
        • Our Negro and Indian Missions, 1926-1976
        • The Quarterly, 1977-1995
        • The Annual Report of the Black and Indian Home Mission Collection, 1996-[ongoing]

The general publications consist of Commission appeal letters, and posters, plus its charter, bi-laws, and related 1915 correspondence.

Other series within the records of the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians and other Marquette University collections also contain documentation relating to this series.

This series has been microfilmed through 1976. However, the microfilm version of Mission work Among the Negroes and the Indians and Report of the Mission Work Among the Negroes and the Indians are included under Sub-series 7-2, not 7-1.

Index to Illustrations in Our Negro and Indian Missions: This is an in-house card index to illustrations, which is arranged chronologically by issue and thereunder by page number, 1926-1942. Original photographic prints for some of the Native American illustrations are located in series 9-1 and some of the African American illustrations are located in series 9-2.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. Consult an archivist for further information.

Work in-progress: The Marquette University Libraries are developing bibliographic records for the publications in this collection. This includes all books, pamphlets, magazines, newsletters, prayer cards, published maps, published sound and video recordings, etc., and excludes clipping files and reprints of articles. As they are created, the bibliographic records will appear in Marqcat, the Marquette University online catalog. Furthermore, as an interim and supplemental search tool, most titles to publications in this and related collections appear in the Index to Publications in Native America Collections.


Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians) and the Catholic Negro-American Mission Board (The Catholic Board for Mission Work among the Colored People), Series 9, Photography: Contains two format-based sub-series -- Black and white prints and color prints. Both series are contained in folders arranged alphabetically by U.S. states and the District of Columbia, followed by foreign countries and there under by communities and Catholic institutions. Many of the prints were sent on request to first the Commission, and then Board, from pastors and school principals. With very few exceptions, the Commission created or collected all photography before 1980, whereas the Board created or collected all photography thereafter. Portraits of Commission and/or Board personnel also involved with the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions (e.g. Reverend Tennelly, Monsignor Lenz, Reverend Paysse) are filed under Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions, series 9-1 (black & white prints) and 9-3 (color prints) and thereunder, "District of Columbia, Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions". Other series within the records of the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians and other Marquette University collections also contain documentation relating to this series.

For each folder, the dates noted are limited to the first and last known years when images were created with intervening years, if any, not included. These are followed by “undated” to indicate images for which the year of their creation is not known. However, if approximate dates are known, they are given in parentheses as follows:

· “undated (Received Commission for Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians)” = No creation years known; the years given identify when the Commission received the images, which typically was less than five years after they were taken.

· “undate (Used Our Negro and Indian Missions)” or “undated (Used Other Title)” = No creation years known; the years given identify when Our Negro and Indian Missions or Other Title first published the images, which typically was less than 10 years after they were taken.

· "undated" (ca. year-year) = No creation years known; the years given identify the approximate years derived from clues within the images and related text.

The institutions listed are mostly local churches and schools and were the sources for the Commission’s photography. Most photographs within these folders document local events of the institutions and nearby communities. However, many nearby communities also have separate institutions and corresponding folders as do those distant places that have been identified. Events located far from the institutions that sent the photographs, including those taken out-of-state and outside of the United States, are arranged by the place where the photographs were taken rather than by the institution that provided the prints.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. Consult an archivist for further information.

Series 9-2, Black and White Prints: Pastors with consumer-grade portable cameras captured most images, which include scenes such as school graduations, retreat weekends, first communions, confirmations, and dedications of new buildings. Professional photographers also captured a few black and white images before 1930. Most prints were scanned in 2011 (total: 77 images).

After 1930, the secretary of the Commission for the the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians (Black and Indian Mission Collection) was also the director of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions. Portraits of Bureau personnel are filed in series 9-1 under "District of Columbia, Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions" and those of Saint Katharine Drexel are under " Pennsylvania, Bensalem, Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament". Prints from the Catholic Negro-American Mission Board are also included and so-noted in the container list.

Series 9-4, Color Prints: Pastors and diocesan program directors with consumer-grade portable cameras captured most images, which include scenes such as school graduations, retreat weekends, first communions, confirmations, and dedications of new buildings. Several images pertain to activities of the Archdiocese of St. Louis. Most prints were scanned in 2011 (total: 102 images).

After 1930, the secretary of the Commission for the the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians (Black and Indian Mission Collection) was also the director of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions. Portraits of Bureau personnel are filed in series 9-1 under "District of Columbia, Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions" and those of Saint Katharine Drexel are under " Pennsylvania, Bensalem, Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament". Prints from the Catholic Negro-American Mission Board are also included and so-noted in the container list.


Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 12, Art Work: This series contains art work and related charts for publications in 1937.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. Consult an archivist for further information.

 


Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 13, Maps: This series contains the U.S. map, Catholic Percent of Black Population, 1982.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. Consult an archivist for further information.


Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 14-2, General Publications: Monograph and serial publications on Catholic evangelization of African Americans, which were collected by the Commission. Some items include contributions by Commission personnel or research conducted with Commission documentation. The arrangement is alphabetical by key word. Other series within the records of the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians and other Marquette University collections also contain documentation relating to this series.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. Consult an archivist for further information.


Black and Indian Mission Collection (Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians), Series 16, Government Publications: The other U.S. Department of the Interior documents (Series 16-1-4) include Black Education, 1928, 1930-1931, which pertains to African Americans. All other U.S. Government documents in this series pertain to Native Americans. Other series within the records of the Commission for the Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians and other Marquette University collections also contain documentation relating to this series.

Restrictions: Researchers assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright which may be involved in the use of these records. Consult an archivist for further information.


More Related Resources

  • Christianity and Native America: Checklist of Marquette Native Catholic collections plus access to detailed information about them including genealogical records; access to digital image collections and The Indian Sentinel historic magazine online; information for educators about Saint Kateri Tekakwitha and her Native Catholic followers.

  • Catholic Social Action: Checklist of Marquette Catholic Social Action collections, which includes all special collections about African American Catholics.

Black and Indian Mission Office > Black & Indian Mission Collection

Tekakwitha Conference National Center

The National Black Catholic Congress

U.S. Catholic Conference of Catholic Bishops > Cultural Diversity in the Church

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