Tekakwitha Conference Records - History, Notable Events about Kateri Tekakwitha Native Catholics and the Tekakwitha Conference

Dates Events
1656-1680   Kateri Tekakwitha (Mohawk-Algonquin, 1656-1680) lived a holy life in the Mohawk Nation of New York and later in Quebec, Canada. Soon after her death, devotions were initiated by local Indian and non-Indian Catholics who had known her. In 1676 she was baptized Catherine after St. Catherine of Siena, also a mystic.  The next year, three Mohawk catechists from La Prairie (Quebec) visited the Mohawk Nation and took Kateri with them on their return home.  In Canada, her feast day became the anniversary of her death (April 17) whereas in the United States, it became the anniversary of her flight to Canada (July 14).
1884 At the Third Plenary Council at Baltimore, the U.S. bishops signed the postulation brief to introduce the canonization causes to Rome for the Jesuit martyrs and St. Kateri Tekakwitha.
1885 Signatures supporting St. Kateri's cause: From January to April in Canada and the United States, 906 native people supported her canonization cause by signing letters of endorsement. The signers included Charles F. Finkbonner (Lummi ancestor of Jake Finkbonner), the holy man Black Elk (Oglala; baptized 1904), and over 150 Lakota people from present-day North and South Dakota. These letters were added to the postulation brief, which the Vatican published with signatures in 1916.
1891-1900       Congregation of American Sisters: Under the leadership of Mother M. Catherine Sacred White Buffalo (Hunkpapa) and Rev. Francis M. Craft (Mohawk), several Hunkpapa women from the Standing Rock Reservation founded a religious community inspired by Blessed Kateri. Their community grew to 12 and served the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota. During the Spanish-American War, four of the American Sisters served as nurses in the U.S. Army in Cuba and reportedly they were the first American Indian women to serve officially in the Armed Forces of the United States.
1930 Pope Pius XII canonized the Jesuit martyrs.
1931 St. Kateri's cause reintroduced: Since the Congregation of Rites had separated St. Kateri's cause from that of the Jesuit martyrs, her caused was reintroduced and a postulator was appointed. Thereafter, Native Catholic awareness grew through publications, sodalities, and school plays.
1939     1st Annual Meeting, Fargo, North Dakota: October 4-5. Highlights: 27 clergy and three lay Native Catholics attended from Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota at the invitation of Bishop Aloysius Muench. Purpose of conference, native language usage, and Catholic schools. Thereafter they agreed to meet annually. Until 1976, these meetings served as exchanges of pastoral thoughts among missionaries.
1940   2nd Annual Meeting, Jamestown, North Dakota: Knights of Columbus Hall, October 15-16. Highlights: Attendees named the Conference in honor of Catherine (Kateri) Tekakwitha and discussed Catholic schools, church census taking, and Catholic life on reservations. 
1941 3rd Annual Meeting, Chamberlain, South Dakota: St. Joseph's School, October 6-8. Highlights: Attendees discussed Catholic schools and alcoholism.
1942 4th Annual Meeting: [October 5-7?].
1943 5th Annual Meeting: [October 4-6?].
  Pope Pius XII declared Kateri Tekakwitha "Servant of God" the first of three steps towards canonization as a saint.
1944 6th Annual Meeting: [October 9-11?].
1945 No Meeting
1946 7th Annual Meeting, Stephan, South Dakota: Immaculate Conception Mission, October 7-9. Highlights: Attendees discussed Catholic schools, Native vocations, and Catholic life on reservations.
1947 8th Annual Meeting, St. Michael, North Dakota: St. Michael's Mission, October 6-7. Highlights: 50 people attended who discussed Catholic schools and Catholic life on reservations. Portrait in photography series.
1948 9th Annual Meeting, Marty, South Dakota: St. Paul's Mission, October 4-6. Highlights: Catholic life on reservations and movement of families to off-reservation towns. 
1949 10th Annual Meeting, Belcourt, North Dakota: St. Anne's Mission, October 10-12. Highlights: Catholic schools, Catholic life on reservations, and cooperation with the United States government.
1950 11th Annual Meeting, Stephan, South Dakota: October 10-11. Highlights: Catholic schools and Catholic life on reservations.
1951 12th Annual Meeting: [October 8-10?].
1952 13th Annual Meeting: [October 6-8?].
1953 14th Annual Meeting: [October 5-7?].
1954 15th Annual Meeting, Stephan, South Dakota: [October 4-6?].
1955 16th Annual Meeting, Marvin, South Dakota: Blue Cloud Abbey, [October 10-12?].
1956   17th Annual Meeting, Chamberlain, South Dakota: St. Joseph's School, October 8-10. Theme: Social Order and the Indian. Highlights: Guest speakers: Dr. Ben Reifel (Brulé) and Robert Bennett, both of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.   
1957   18th Annual Meeting, Rapid City, South Dakota: Mother Butler Center, September 23-25. Highlights: 38 people attended who discussed Catholic schools, youth and urban adjustment with reports from Los Angeles, Rapid City, Salt Lake City, and elsewhere. Portrait in photography series.
1958   19th Annual Meeting, Stephan, South Dakota: Immaculate Conception School, September 22-24. Highlights: Discussed Catholic schools, youth and adjustment to off-reservation life with reports from Los Angeles, Rapid City, Milwaukee, and elsewhere.
1959 20th Annual Meeting: [September 22-24?].
1960 21st Annual Meeting: [September 19-21?].
1961 22nd Annual Meeting, Pine Ridge, South Dakota: Holy Rosary Mission, [September 18-20?].
1962 23rd Annual Meeting, St. Michael, North Dakota: St. Michael's Mission, August 7-9. Theme: Indian Pastoral Conference. Highlights: 17 people attended with discussions on the Sioux for Christ radio program.  Portrait in photography series. 
1963     24th Annual Meeting, Richardson, North Dakota: Assumption Abbey, August 6-8. Highlights: 17 people attended (included three Canadians) who discussed Catholic schools and Catholic life on reservations and off-reservation relocation. The Conference established an international liaison and considered but refused to admit religious sisters as members. The secretary, Reverend Patrick Moore, O.S.B. and his successors, began to compile the Conference archival records, which were then kept at St. Paul's Mission, Marty, South Dakota. Portrait in photography series. 
1964 25th Annual Meeting, Chamberlain, South Dakota: St. Joseph's School, August 10-13. Highlights: 39 people attended (from 14 states) who discussed Catechetics and liturgy on the reservation and at reservation schools. Portrait in Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions Records and online in Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions Digital Image Collection.
1965   26th Annual Meeting, Marvin, South Dakota: Blue Cloud Abbey, August 9-11. Theme: What is the Goal of the Present Day Indian Mission? Highlights: The attendees began to include Native men, such as Rev. John J. Brown, S.J. (Silksika [Blackfeet]) discussed the mission of Church, contemporary Native culture and the sacred pipe.
1966 27th Annual Meeting, Ashland, Montana: St. Labre Mission, August 8-10. Highlights: Attendees discussed the mission of church, Native vocations, contemporary Native culture, the sacred pipe.
1967     28th Annual Meeting, St. Norbert, Manitoba, Canada: Villa Marie Retreat House, August 7-9, the first meeting in Canada. Highlights: Attendees (including Canadian scholrs) discussed the mission of Church, effective evangelization, liturgical adaptation with the sacred pipe and problems of alcoholism. This was the first meeting held in Canada and the first to involve Canadian scholars and missionaries. Native Catholics on some reservations now held Junior Tekakwitha Conference meetings.
1968 29th Annual Meeting, Marvin, South Dakota: Blue Cloud Abbey, August 9-11. Mr. John Williams (Dakota?) served as lay director of the conference.
1969     30th Annual Meeting, Marvin, South Dakota: Blue Cloud Abbey, August 4-6. Theme: The New Indian Generation. Highlights: Discussions led by Br. Edward M. Red Owl, O.S.B., focused on "Red power" and the Tekakwitha Conference reorganized with an Executive Secretary as its principal office. Br. Edward Red Owl served that year and distributed the Conference's first newsletter.
1970 31st Annual Meeting, Marvin, South Dakota: Blue Cloud Abbey, August 10-12. Highlights: Attendees discussed liturgical adaptation and the Native diaconate.
1971   32nd Annual Meeting, Pine Ridge, South Dakota: Holy Rosary Mission, August 9-11. Theme: Present-Day Thrust of Indian People for Self-Determination. Highlights: Birgil Kills Straight (glala) served as keynote speaker with attendees discussing Native diaconate and conversion of mission schools to lay control.
  Association of Native Religious and Clergy (ANRC) established, which is comprised of Native American Catholic clergy and religious from the United States and Canada. Since 1979, its annual gathering has been held nearby and just prior to the annual meeting of the Tekakwitha Conference. It is not incorporated. Many ANRC members have been active in both organizations.
1972 33rd Annual Meeting, Duluth, Minnesota: August 6-8. Theme: Indian Ministry through Parish Councils. 
1973 34th Annual Meeting, Chamberlain, South Dakota: St. Joseph's School, August 6-8. Highlights: Rev. Ignatius M. Roppolo and Rev. Alvin A. Schexnaildre, both from the Archdiocese of New Orleans, served as keynote speakers, re: team ministry and its effectiveness in serving minority peoples with attendees discussing Native urban and youth ministry.
1974 35th Annual Meeting, Ashland, Montana: St. Labre Mission, [August 5-7?].
1975 36th Annual Meeting: [August 4-6?].
1976 37th Annual Meeting, Watertown, South Dakota: [August 9-11?].
1977 38th Annual Meeting, Rapid City, South Dakota: August [8-11?]. Theme: Re-evaluation of purpose.
  Monsignor Paul A. Lenz, secretary of the Commission for Catholic Missions Among the Colored People and the Indians (and director of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions), promised financial support for further development of the conference.
1978     39th Annual Meeting, Rapid City, South Dakota: St. Martin's Academy, August 7-10. Theme: Toward a Better Understanding of the Present and Future Direction of the Catholic Church with Native American Tribes. Highlights: 220 people attended with Sr. M. Jose Hobday, S.S.S.F. (Seneca), Rupert Costo, editor of Wassaja, and R. Pierce Beaver, historian of Protestant Indian missions, served as keynote speakers who presented provocative addresses.
1979 40th Annual Meeting, Yankton, South Dakota: Mount Marty College, August 6-9. Theme: Action Workshop. Highlights: ca. 200 people attended (included 66 Native Catholics). The Native Catholics challenged the clergy to listen to their concerns. In response, the Conference suspended its agenda and under the leadership of Harold Condon, Sr. M. Jose Hobday, S.S.S.F., and Bea Swanson, the “Circle of 66” met with Monsignor Paul A. Lenz (Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions), Bishop Harold J. Dimmerling (Rapid City, South Dakota), Bishop Thomas Murphy (Great Falls, Montana), and Bishop William G. Connare (Greensburg, Pennsylvania) (Chair, U.S. Catholic Conference Mission Committee) to articulate their concerns, re: Catholic Church’s insensitivity to indigenous people in the United States and their heritage.
  The Tekakwitha Conference incorporated with a board of directors, the National Conference of Catholic Bishops appointed an Episcopal Moderator, and it became listed in The Official Catholic Directory.
1980   41st Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado: Loretto Heights College, August 4-7. Theme: Celebrating the Beatification and 300th Anniversary of Kateri Tekekwitha's Death. Highlights: 600 people attended, including 475 Native Americans who comprised a majority for the first time.
  The Tekakwitha Conference established a National Center, first in Bozeman, Montana and later in Great Falls, Montana. With encouragement from the National Center, members began to organize local affinity groups, which became known as "Kateri Circles."
  Pope John Paul II declared Kateri Tekakwitha to be "Blessed," the second of three steps toward canonization (formal recognition) as a saint.
1981     42nd Annual Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico: August 3-7. Theme: Emerging Catholic Native American and Eskimo Church. Highlights: Pilgrimage to Santo Domingo Pueblo with liturgy by Archbishop Robert Sanchez and ceremonies by the Squash and Turquoise Moieties, August 4; and deacon communion service, August 5, which included liturgy with a Laguna eagle dance.
1982       43rd Annual Meeting, Spokane, Washington: Gonzaga University, August 9-13. Theme: A Spiritual Journey, A Healing Dialogue Between Native and Catholic Ways. Highlights: Archbishop Pio Laghi, U.S. Papal Nuncio, apologized to Native Americans for the wrongs caused by the Catholic Church’s evangelization. In addition to workshops at the annual meetings, the National Center began offering institutes and workshops at other times and places. Membership beyond the United States expanded significantly, principally into Canada. other times and places. Membership beyond the United States expanded significantly, principally into Canada.
1983   44th Annual Meeting, Collegeville, Minnesota: St. John's University and College of St. Benedict, August 10-14. Theme: Living in Our Creator's Love and Truth, A Healing--within ourselves, with one another, with Mother Earth, and with all creation. 
  Primarily to provide better representation for the now expanded national membership, the board of directors expanded from three to nine members. It included seven at-large members elected by the general membership and two board-appointed ex-officio members, the executive directors of the Tekakwitha Conference and the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions.
1984         45th Annual Meeting, Phoenix, Arizona: August 1-5. Theme: A Journey of Hope, Dancing and Singing in the Desert. Highlights: Opening ceremonies, August 1; The Lord's Prayer in Plains Indian sign language by youth group of St. Catherine's High School, Santa Fe, August 1 and 2; Kateri Song by Joseph W. Thomas and family (Pima), August 1; liturgy by Reverend Edmund Savilla (Isleta, Oneida, Quechan), August 2; Indian anthem in Plains Indian sign language by youth group of St. Catherine's High School, Santa Fe, and healing prayer service [with pipe ceremony?] by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., August 2; sunrise prayer service by Rev. Diego Mazon, O.F.M., August 3; liturgy [with pipe ceremony?] by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., and powwow and chicken scratch dance, August 4; and liturgy by Reverend Donald E. Pelotte, S.S.S., August 5. [Included liturgy with eagle dance (Laguna).]
1985             46th Annual Meeting, Syracuse, New York: LeMoyne College, August 7-11. Theme: A Sacred Journey: Walking in the Footsteps of Blessed Kateri. Highlights: Opening ceremonies, Kateri Song, St. Lucy's Parish, Syracuse, keynote address by Sister M. Jose Hobday, S.S.S.F., and healing prayer service, August 7; tours of National Tekakwitha Shrine, Fonda, with prayer drama, "The Life of Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha," by Sarah Hassenplug (Mohawk), and Jesuit Martyrs Shrine, Auriesville with liturgy honoring Blessed Kateri and candlelight rosary procession in various languages, August 8; and tour of St. Regis Reserve, Kahnawaké, Quebec, with liturgies honoring Blessed Kateri by Rev. Georges Mathieu and Rev. Collins P. Jordan, August 9; morning prayer and round dance by Mescalero Apache, deacon communion service, native fashion show, and powwow; and sunrise liturgy by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., August 11. At nearby Auriesville, New York, Archbishop Pio Laghi prayed with the sacred pipe during Mass. This was interpreted that not only were native rituals appropriate within church ceremonies, but that the church was now open to embracing native peoples and learning from them.
1986         47th Annual Meeting, Bozeman, Montana: August 6-10. Theme: Eagle Wings- Mountain Peaks, Celebrating Faith and Unity. Highlights: Opening ceremonies with pipe ceremony by Burton Pretty on Top, keynote address by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., and prayer to Blessed Kateri in Plains Indian sign language by Delma Heavy Runner (Siksika [Blackfeet]) and Freda Heavy Runner (Siksika [Blackfeet]), August 6; deacon communion service and healing prayer service, August 7; sunrise liturgy [with pipe ceremony?] by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., and youth liturgy by Rev. Edmund Savilla, August 8; powwow, August 9; and morning prayers with sweet grass blessing in Salish [Flathead], drama of Jesuits coming to Bitteroot Valley, and Salish hymns, August 10.
  At the invitation of Pope John Paul II, Burton Pretty on Top and Rev. Gil Hemaeuer, O.F.M. Cap., as Tekakwitha Conference representatives, participated in the World Day of Prayer for Peace, October 27, Assisi, Italy.
1987         48th Annual Meeting, Phoenix, Arizona: September 12-14. Theme: Unity in the Work of Service, Building up the Body of Christ. Highlights: Opening ceremonies with pipe ceremony by Burton Pretty on Top and Mountain Spirit ceremony with dancers and medicine man Sidney Baca (Mescalero Apache), August 12; liturgy by Bishop Donald E. Pelotte, S.S.S. and healing prayer service [with pipe ceremony?] by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., and sunrise prayer service [with pipe ceremony?] by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., liturgy honoring Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha by Bishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., and prayer celebration by Pope John Paul II with intertribal dancing and the Lord's Prayer in Plains Indian sign language and song led by Miles Brandon (Eskimo), August 14. [Included liturgies with pipe ceremonies and eagle dances (Laguna)?]
1988               49th Annual Meeting, Bozeman, Montana: August 10-14. Theme: Rising to New Life. Highlights: Opening ceremonies and keynote panel, August 10; liturgy Bishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. and healing prayer service [with pipe ceremony?] by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., August 11; sunrise liturgy [with pipe ceremony?] by Reverend John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., and prayers for world peace with candlelight procession, August 12; powwow, August 13; and water ceremony and liturgy by Bishop Donald E. Pelotte, S.S.S., August 14. The Tekakwitha Conference wrote a vision statement through small group discussion and large group consensus under the leadership of Rev. Michael Galvan, President of the Board of Directors. It identified five problems and five strengths, which needed development. The problems: 1. insufficient religious education programs and Catholic schools; 2. inadequate numbers of teachers; 3. alcoholism and substance abuse; 4. insufficient youth involvement; 5. lack of unity and low self-esteem. The strengths: 1. native spirituality; 2. unity; 3. strong family-centeredness; 4. involvement by youth; and 5. lay, religious, and ordained community ministries. Since then, there has been regular lay involvement in conference administration and workshops on parenting and family life and alcoholism and drug abuse.
  Native American Deacons Association founded in Great Falls, Montana. Its is to serve as a resource and support group for Native Americans and the Church. The Association is not incorporated and meets annually during the Tekakwitha Conference. Many NADA members have been active in both organizations. 
1989           50th Annual Meeting, Fargo, North Dakota: August 2-6. Theme: Walking the Sacred Circle with Jesus Christ. Highlights: Opening ceremonies with pipe ceremony and dances honoring Blessed Kateri (Dakota, Mohawk, Ojibwa, Hupa), August, 2; rosary and song coordinated by Phillipia Jose (Tohono O'odham) and William Antoine (Tohono O'odham), August 2-5; keynote address by Cardinal Frances Arinze, August 3; sunrise liturgy by Reverend Collins P. Jordan, celebration of song, dance and poetry by Cochiti Pueblo group and St. Catherine's Indian Choir (Dakota), and healing prayer service by Deacon Victor Bull Bear and Deacon Harold Congdon, August 4; powwow, August 5; and liturgy by Cardinal Frances Arinze, August 6. [Included liturgy with eagle dance (Laguna).] In 1989, a lay Native Catholic director was appointed as the first Native American director and the Conference is awarded the Pope Paul VI Award of the N.C.C.E. (National Council of Catholic Evangelization).
1990       51st Annual Meeting, Tucson, Arizona: August 1-5. Theme: Blessed Kateri: On New Horizons. Highlights: Opening ceremonies, August, 1; Kateri Life Story (Mohawk group), keynote address by Rev. Michael Galvan, liturgy by Bishop Donald E. Pelotte, S.S.S. (Abenaki), and celebration at San Xavier Mission, August 2; liturgy [with pipe ceremony?] by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap. and healing prayer service, August 3; sunrise prayer service with Navajo blessing and powwow, August 4; and liturgy by Bishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., August 5. [Included liturgy with eagle dance (Laguna).] 33 local Kateri Circles were registered with the Tekakwitha Conference National Office.
  Annual regional meetings: South Dakota established its first statewide "Mini-Tekakwitha Conference on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Other states and regions established annual local conferences elsewhere.
1991       52nd Annual Meeting, Norman, Oklahoma: August 7-11. Theme: Gathered in Unity and Love through Blessed Kateri. Highlights: Opening ceremonies, August, 7; keynote address, story of Blessed Kateri by Mohawk group, liturgy honoring Blessed Kateri, and healing prayer service, August 8; liturgy honoring youth and elders, August 9; sunrise prayer service, liturgy honoring all participants, and powwow, August 10. [Included liturgies with Lord's Prayer in Plains Indian sign language, eagle dance (Laguna), and pipe ceremony by Burton Pretty on Top. 130 adult and youth Kateri Circles were registered with the National Center. Devotions to Kateri Tekakwitha had spread to Native South Americans. 
1992       53rd Annual Meeting, Orono, Maine: August 5-9. Theme: Sharing our Sacred Journey. Highlights: Opening ceremonies, August 5; sunrise liturgy with pipe ceremony at Mount Cadillac by Rev. John S. Hascall, O.F.M. Cap., story of Blessed Kateri by Mohawk group, keynote address by Michele Attean (Penobscot) and Graydon Nicholas (Maliseet), tour of Indian Island Reservation with blessing by crown dancers (Apache); sunrise prayer services, August 7-9; morning prayers with pipe ceremony by Burton Pretty on Top, keynote address by Chet Eagleman (Ojibwa), and healing prayer service, August 7; powwow, August 8; and blessing, August 9. [Included liturgy with eagle dance (Laguna).]
1993         54th Annual Meeting, Seattle, Washington: August 4-8. Theme: Re-awaking the Spirit Within: By Remembering, Reconciling, and Recommitting Ourselves as the People. Highlights: Opening ceremonies with pipe ceremony and Eskimo dances, August 4; tour of Swinomish and Lummi Reservation with Lummi dances, canoe races, and music, August 5; sunrise prayer service and healing prayer service, August 6; sunrise prayer service, story of Blessed Kateri by Daniels (Mohawk), liturgy by Bishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., and powwow, August 9; and morning prayers and blessing at Snoqualmie Falls by Kenny Moses (Snoqualmie). An Outreach Ministry Program among urban Native American Catholics was begun by the Tekakwitha Conference National Center.
  The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops organized a Committee on Native American Catholics, which began offering training programs in cooperation with the Tekakwitha Conference National Center. 
1994     55th Annual Meeting, Bemidji, Minnesota:  August 3-7. Theme: Living Water. Source of Peace. Renewal of Creation. Highlights: Opening ceremonies with pipe ceremony by Deacon Don Goodwin, August 3; Gospel music, August 3-5; sunrise liturgy at Itasca State Park (headwaters of Mississippi River) by Rev. Diego Mazon, O.F.M., keynote address by Darrell Auginash (Ojibwa), August 4; sunrise prayer service with pipe ceremony and tour of Red Lake Reservation, August 5; powwow, August 6; and blessing, August 7.
1995     56th Annual Meeting, Potsdam, New York: August 2-6. Theme: Sharing our Spirit and Love in Kateri's Country. Highlights: Opening ceremonies, August 2; sunrise prayer services, August 3-5; healing prayer service, August 3; pilgrimage to Blessed Kateri's tomb, St. Francis-Xavier Church, Kahnawaké Reserve, Quebec, August 4; tour of St. Regis Reserve with powwow, August 5.
1996     57th Annual Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico: August 7-11. Theme: A Closer Walk with Jesus and Kateri. Highlights: Opening ceremonies, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico. Opening ceremonies, August 7; sunrise prayer services, August 8-10; story of Blessed Kateri, tour of Laguna Pueblo with Laguna dances, liturgy by Bishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., and powwow, August 10. 
1997     58th Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Marquette University, August 6-10. Theme: Building Bridges, All Nations United through Faith. Highlights: Keynote address by Rev. Ben Bushyhead (Methodist) and sunrise prayer services on Lake Michigan.
1998 59th Annual Meeting, Memphis, Tennessee: August 5-9. Theme: Kateri's Miracle, Completing the Circle, People of Christ Uniting in the Year of the Holy Spirit.
1999 60th Annual Meeting, Spokane, Washington: Gonzaga University, August 4-8. Theme: Many Pathways to Our Creator -- One Love. 
2000 61st Annual Meeting, Lincoln, Nebraska: August 2-6. Theme: Kateri 2000, Walking through the Heartland. 
2001 62nd Annual Meeting, San Diego, California: July 18-22. Theme: Coast to Coast We Gather under the Cross with Blessed Kateri.
2002 63rd Annual Meeting, Lansing, Michigan: July 31-August 4. Theme: The Spirit of Kateri in the Land of the Great Lakes, Blessing, Cleansing, Living and Loving.
2003 64th Annual Meeting, Sioux Falls, South Dakota: July 30-August 3. Theme: We are All Related through Kateri and Share our Culture and Faith on the Great Plains.
2004   65th Annual Meeting, El Paso, Texas: July 28-August 1. Theme: The People of the Sun gather with All Nations to reunite with Blessed Kateri in Prayer, Renewal and Fellowship. Highlights: Pilgrimage to Ysleta del Sur Pueblo and Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church.
2005 66th Annual Meeting, Tucson, Arizona: July 20-July 24. Theme: Blessed Kateri, Bearer of Spiritual Rain from the Mountains to the Desert to all Nations. Highlights: Pilgrimage to San Xavier Mission. 
2006 On March 4, Sister Kateri Mitchell went to Seattle to prepare for the annual meeting to be held in Seattle. Due to a special request, she first visited Jacob Finkbonner at Seattle Children's Hospital who was gravely ill with a strep A infection on his face. While at his bedside Sister Kateri and Jake's mother prayed to Kateri Tekakwitha for her intercession while pressing a her first-class relic to his body. While in surgery minutes later, hospital staff removed Jake's bandages and discovered that he was disease free. Yet on the previous day when they applied the bandages, the upper half of his body was disease covered.
  67th Annual Meeting, Burien (Seattle), Washington: John F. Kennedy High School, July 19-23. Theme: We raise our Hands in Honor of Blessed Kateri, We hold up our Youth on the Wings of Eagles. Highlights: 1,103 people attended with pilgrimage to Lummi Reservation, July 21, which included the announcement on the Vatican investigation of Jacob Finkbonner's miraculous healing. 
2007 68th Annual Meeting, Baltimore, Maryland: June 27-July 1. Theme: Harmony, Peace, Justice through Blessed Kateri. Highlights: 1,118 people attended with pilgrimage to Immaculate Conception Basilica. 
2008 69th Annual Meeting, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: July 2-6. Theme: One Heart, All Nations. Highlights: 899 people attended with pilgrimage to Shrine at Lac Sainte Anne.
2009 70th Annual Meeting, Raleigh, North Carolina: July 1-5. Theme: With Kateri We spread God's Word. Highlights: 520 people attended.
2010 71st Annual Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico: July 28-August 1. Theme: We Walk in Beauty with Kateri in the Land of Enchantment. Highlights: 974 people attended.
2011 72nd Annual Meeting, Tucson, Arizona: July 20-July 24. Theme: The Grand Canyon State is Enriched by Kateri Tekakwitha. Highlights: 775 people attended with pilgrimage to San Xavier Mission. 
  On December 17, Pope Benedict approved the 2006 instantaneous healing of Jacob Finkbonner as a first class miracle attributed to Kateri Tekakwitha's intercession.
2012 73rd Annual Meeting, Albany, New York: July 18-22. Theme: Walking in Her Footsteps in Kateri Country. Highlights: 907 people attended with pilgrimage to Auriesville and Fonda shrines.
  Pope Benedict XVI canonized Kateri Tekakwitha as a saint in heaven, October 21.
2013 74th Annual Meeting, El Paso, Texas: July 17-21. Theme: Celebrating Faith, Culture and Tradition. Highlights: 645 people attended with pilgrimage to Ysleta del Sur Pueblo and Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church.
  With the purchase of a new National Center, the Tekakwitha Conference relocated to Alexandria, Louisiana.
2014 75th Annual Meeting, Fargo, North Dakota: July 23-27. Theme: To Walk Humbly. Highlights: 725 people attended.
2015 76th Annual Meeting, Alexandria, Louisiana: July 22-26. Theme: Saint Kateri Embraces the Wetlands. Highlights: 511 peop[le attended and toured the new National Center.
2016 77th Annual Meeting, Burlingame, California: July 20-24. Theme: - Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, the Bridge between Our Faith & Our Traditions. Highlights: 680 people attended.
2017 78th Annual Meeting, Rapid City, South Dakota: July . Theme: - Highlights: 763 people attended.
2018 79th Annual Meeting, Tacoma, Washington: July 18-22. Theme: Highlights: - people attended with pilgrimage to St. Joachim's Church, Lummi Reservation.
2019 80th Annual Meeting, Sharonville, Ohio: July 17-21. Theme: From all Directions, St. Kateri leads us to Holiness.
2020 81st Annual Meeting, Raleigh, North Carolina: July 15-19.
2021 82nd Annual Meeting, Las Cruces, New Mexico: July 21-25.
2022 82nd Annual Meeting, Undetermined:
2023 82nd Annual Meeting, Alabama:
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