APA @ Marquette Tutorial



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Plagiarism »

If you submit someone else's work as your own, you commit plagiarism. To attempt to earn credit for someone else's work is a fraudulent act, whether the original work is published or unpublished.

Misleading your instructor and other readers about the source of your work constitutes plagiarism even if you have permission of the original author to do so, whether explicit permission (e.g., friends conspire to submit the same paper for credit) or implicit permission (e.g., a student downloads a paper from a Web site or copies a paper from an organization's files.)

There are 3 common types of plagiarism you must avoid when writing your paper.

1.) NOT USING QUOTATION MARKS:

2.) PARAPHRASING IS TOO SIMILAR TO SOURCE:

3.) NOT CITING THE SOURCE OF INFORMATION

PLAGIARISM AND MARQUETTE

Marquette has taken a strong stance against plagiarism. In addition to the Academic honesty policies and procedures, the university utilizes Turnitin.com's Originality Checking, software which generates a report that compares submitted text against a continuously updated database of millions of pages of previously submitted student papers, journal articles and accessible internet sites. Faculty use the Originality Report to evaluate student work for proper citations and attribution, as well as for plagiarism.

For additional information regarding Turnitin and plagiarism please visit the Turnitin/Plagiarism research guide from the Raynor Memorial Libraries.


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