OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR

SOC Builder: Course components

How classes are offered; the parts or modules of a course that work together to define the entire structure of a course; each course is composed of one or more components.

NOTE: There are additional components in CheckMarq than what are listed below. These are for the Office of the Registrar use only. You should not have to change any components in your SOC building; however, if you find one that needs to be added or changed, please use only the components below.

Code Course component description
CAP Capstone

A course that integrates content from several sources or courses and is designed to bring reflection and focus to the entire undergraduate/graduate or professional experience, requiring disciplined use of skills, methodology and knowledge learned throughout the curriculum of a specific major, and usually culminating in a research paper or project. Example includes a course taken the last two semesters whereby students research particular themes relevant to the major and synthesize those themes into the skills and knowledge learned throughout the undergraduate career.

CLN Clinical A credit-bearing course that occurs outside the institutional setting (or in an actual clinical laboratory setting) under institutional supervision (usually faculty). It provides practical real-world application of classroom-studied medical- or health care-related theories and may involve work with clients who receive professional services from students. Examples include an eight-week surgical or emergency room rotation that allows students to function as an assistant where they can practice and develop skills learned in the classroom.
CLQ Colloquium

A more interactive and typically smaller course forum than a lecture concentrating on various topics within a broad field of study; content may include student presentations and discussions based on literature, theory, problems or research. Enrollment is generally limited to allow for greater focus on students' critical reflection and exchange of ideas. Lecture is not the dominant pedagogical activity of the course; courses of this type are typically led by a different instructor each class session who is an expert on the topic being discussed for that session. Examples include a course that may explore a variety of ethical issues in a particular field, such as medicine or science. Each issue explored would be led by an expert in that particular issue being discussed.

COP Cooperative education

A credit-bearing structured field experience that integrates classroom study and work experience; cooperative education requires a formal partnership be established between an employer and a faculty person or college where monitor the work and experiences of the student and often the student is not registered for any other courses during this time. Examples include engineering students who work/learn in an engineering firm for an entire semester where they can put into practice what they have learned in the classroom and where the grade for the class is determined by the firm's evaluation of the student and the academic work relating to the coop experience required by the college when the student returns to the university.

DIS Discussion

A section of a larger course, designed solely for group discussion. Discussions are typically non-credit bearing and linked to a credit-bearing course (i.e., are not stand alone courses). As such, discussion sections generally contain fewer students than the course to which they are linked. Examples include a mandatory zero-credit discussion section linked to an introductory psychology classroom-based course.

ENS Ensemble

A course where students work with an instructor to create a performance as a group. Section size may vary based on requirements of the performance. Examples include concert choir or marching band.

IND Independent study/research

A course where students complete individualized and often self-paced plans of study or research that is more in-depth than what is offered within the curriculum and independent of the classroom setting. The instructor and students negotiate the details of the plan of study. Independent study/research courses generally have no officially scheduled regular meeting days and times and are typically offered only to upper classmen or post-baccalaureate students.

INT Internship/externship

Credit-bearing course that offers field experience and provides students with externally supervised practical real-world training in a setting consistent with a student's education goals; courses are designed to give students supervised and practical application of previously studied theory in a setting outside the classroom, but not necessarily one that is strictly clinical or medical in nature (which would be CLN). Unlike practica, a student enrolled in an internship or externship may be paid for the educational experience. Examples include business students who might work in a marketing firm or a law student who might work for a judge for a semester while continuing with other course work.

LAB Laboratory A course that may or may not be offered for credit whose purpose is the application of methods and principles of a discipline learned in a traditional classroom-based section. It meets in a controlled environment requiring specialized equipment and/or facilities and the primary emphasis of such courses is often learning by doing.
LEC Lecture

Standard non-variable/fixed-credit course where instruction occurs in a traditional classroom setting; lectures almost always have larger class sizes than seminar; lecture courses may certainly include a variety of pedagogies (discussion, class presentation) but are predominantly lecture oriented. If a course is more discussion or non-lecture dominated, then seminar may be a more applicable course component.

PRC Practicum Credit-bearing courses designed to give students supervised and practical application of previously studied theory in a setting outside the classroom but not necessarily one that is strictly clinical or medical in nature (which would be CLN). Unlike internships or externships, students enrolled in a practicum are not paid for the educational experience. Examples include a public service major who volunteers his/her time in a nonprofit agency in order to practice skills learned in the classroom.
PRO Project

A course that involves the creation of a specific hands-on project designed to allow students to synthesize thoughts about their learning experiences within the curriculum of their major or degree. Examples include a course where senior engineering students design, prototype, test and document concepts incorporating relevant engineering course work and present their design at the final class or a course where teams of advertising students design an entire advertising campaign that incorporates concepts and skills learned in all of their major courses.

QUZ Quiz A regularly scheduled section of a larger course, designed solely for the purpose of taking quizzes throughout the term. Quiz sections are typically non-credit bearing and linked to a credit-bearing course (i.e., are not standalone courses). Examples include a mandatory zero-credit quiz section associated with an introductory physics course.
SEM Seminar/supervised reading

A more interactive and smaller course forum than a lecture concentrating on a more narrow field of study than a colloquium; content may include student presentations and discussions based on literature, theory, problems or research. Enrollment is generally limited to allow for greater focus on students' critical reflection and exchange of ideas. Lecture is not the dominant pedagogical activity of the course; typically courses of this type are led by the same instructor who is an expert in the field being studied. Examples include a course with limited enrollment and highly qualified math majors who spend a semester studying and discussing math concepts as they relate to testing and measurements.

EXP Senior experience A course that integrates content from several sources or courses and reflects on a common theme, allowing students to synthesize thoughts about their learning experiences within the curriculum of their entire undergraduate degree program. Example includes a course required by majors in a particular college where a single issue is studied and analyzed across national, cultural and disciplinary lines.
SEN Senior thesis

A long-term independent research course (usually an academic year or more in length) that is the culmination of a degree program and that allows students to deepen their understanding of a specific issue, while drawing together knowledge from several disciplines; requires a formal research proposal, as well as enlisting faculty advisers and mentors and usually culminates in an oral presentation followed by a question and answer session from the audience and attending faculty.

SKL Simulated skills A course in which students work in teams under the direction of a professor to practice skills that are needed for the workplace. Skills such as developing and discussing annual performance appraisals with employees, negotiating a contract, arguing a case in court, etc.
STU Studio

Courses that involve demonstration and application of design and theory in a defined physical setting (i.e., studio); students explore and experiment under guidance of an instructor, and the class size is usually limited by setting parameters (e.g., No. of computers, drafting tables, etc.). Courses typically focus on the development or creation of artistically static work or the mastery of an art form itself.

SDE Study away, domestic: exchange Courses taught at other U.S. institutions where, as per an agreement between the two institutions, students register for Marquette credit and pay tuition at Marquette.
SIM Study abroad, international: Marquette Courses that are taught at an international location to Marquette students and by Marquette faculty.
THE Thesis research

A formal treatise presenting the results of study submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced degree. The process requires intensive interaction between the student candidate, thesis adviser and supplemental committee members. Undergraduate senior theses are not THE (see SEN).

TIN Topics In Courses that cover a unique perspective or in-depth topic in the major whose subject matters are not routinely offered in the courses approved for the curriculum. Examples include a course offered for only one semester to take advantage of a guest lecturer or visiting faculty member who has a particular expertise in a field of study.
WRK Workshop

Workshops may have irregular beginning and/or end dates (especially at graduate levels). In general, specific hours of actual work (dance, writing, performance, etc.) will need to be completed, work is then evaluated by the instructor and other students, and then work is appropriately revised in order to earn course credit. Workshops provide a creative forum for interactive learning between faculty and all enrolled students. Oftentimes, guest artists or experts may serve as instructors.



ABOUT MARQUETTE

Contact the Office of the Registrar

Mailing Address
Office of the Registrar
P.O. Box 1881
Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881

Phone: (414) 288-4000
FAX: (414) 288-1773